Su-Yin Tan
Su-Yin Tan
Chair
Funmilayo Erinfolami
Funmilayo Erinfolami
Teaching Associate

Access to space can provide practical and valuable benefits to all humankind. The Space Applications Department examines the various applications on Earth that are offered by space technologies with a primary focus on Earth-orbiting satellite systems, ground systems, and end-user equipment hardware and software. Key areas of focus include:

  • Satellite communication systems and services
  • Remote sensing and Earth observation
  • Geographic information systems (GIS)
  • Satellite navigation systems


The Department explores enabling space technologies and their scientific benefits and societal applications. Themes range from telecommunication fundamentals to remote sensing image processing/interpretation, global navigation satellite systems (GNSS), GIS data management, and avionics. Workshops and demonstrations provide hands-on training with hardware and software for satellite payload development, image processing (optical, radar), global positioning systems (GPS), and data analysis. Professional visits to local facilities provide further insight into civilian and commercial space applications.

Participants will be able to:

  • Engage in a variety of workshops, demonstrations, and professional visits that explore enabling space technologies and their applications.
  • Develop proficiency in technological hardware and software for image processing, telecommunications, GIS, and GPS.
  • Design and complete a research project emphasizing the application of space technologies and present results in oral and written formats.
  • Participate in group activities in an interdisciplinary and intercultural environment.
Dennis Irwin
Dennis Irwin
Chair
Shrrirup Nambiar
Shrrirup Nambiar
Teaching Associate

The Space Engineering Department (ENG) allows participants to gain hands-on experience in all stages of the systems engineering process of space systems at multiple levels, from the simplest to the most complex. Building on the knowledge gained during the core lectures related to space engineering, emphasis is placed on understanding each level of system design, integration, and testing as complexity increases from components to subsystems, to spacecraft, to the space mission, and eventually to entire space programs. Throughout the department, participants will also have the opportunity to undertake major projects. The first project is the design, construction, testing, and launch of a model rocket to meet a set of flight requirements, including the safe retrieval of its payload. The second is the design a payload for a stratospheric high altitude balloon that will be launched during the SSP. These projects will allow the participants an opportunity to implement all aspects of the system engineering process in the conception, design, integration, and operation of a simulated spacecraft.

At the end of the department time, the participants should be able to:

  • Approach and analyze a problem with an engineering mindset
  • Design, simulate, manufacture, integrate, test, and launch a model rocket - skills that can be extended to any other complex system.
  • Complete a preliminary design of a particular subsystem of a spacecraft, and predict how different design parameters affect other subsystems.
  • Present and defend a research project in front of a technical audience.
Ana Diaz Artiles
Ana Diaz Artiles
Chair
Anderson Wilder
Anderson Wilder
Teaching Associate

The Human Performance in Space Department examines the physiological, psychological, and medical issues that are unique to human spaceflight, as well as the challenges these issues may present to mission success. Departmental hands-on activities will enable participants to evaluate the challenges of providing medical support during space missions.

Participants will examine issues related to both short- and long-duration/long-distance human space missions, including:

  • Physiological changes and countermeasures to prevent deconditioning of organ systems
  • Constraints of space operational medicine
  • Issues for psychological adaptation to confinement and isolation
  • Extra-vehicular activity and biomechanical analysis of human locomotion


Learning Outcomes:

  • Engage in various workshops, panels, professional visits, and simulations to gain knowledge and understanding of concepts related to human performance in space
  • Practice the training requirements and duties of the Crew Medical Officer
  • Review actual cases of medical issues that past crews have faced during human spaceflight
  • Understand ethical issues related to experimental research and human spaceflight
  • Gain practical training and experience with human missions in extreme environments
  • Design and conduct an individual or group project with a focus on human performance in space, and present findings to an international panel of experts
  • Participate in group activities in an interdisciplinary and intercultural environment
Ruth McAvinia
Ruth McAvinia
Chair
Petter Evju Skanke
Petter Evju Skanke
Teaching Associate

Just as astronauts think differently when they break free from Earth’s surface, so we invite you to break free from everything you’ve learned in the past and think differently in the Humanities department. We will explore the meaning and significance of humankind’s expansion into space in a supportive and creative environment.

In the Humanities department, we ask what factors motivated people to go to space, what we brought with us from Earth to space, and how space has influenced culture and society back on the ground. These investigations will bring us to many meeting points with the other departments, as participants have the chance to approach technical subjects with a new perspective.

During the departmental activities, participants will have the opportunity to learn and practice skills from humanities subjects such as history, archaeology, design, philosophy, drama, and the social sciences. The activities range from guidance on communications and outreach to broader skills for creative thinking and problem solving, and will be practical as well as enjoyable.

Every participant will have the chance to

  • design a mission patch
  • explore the history of space studies in Ireland compared with their home country
  • visit local sites to investigate how space is presented to different audiences
  • think in a new way about their place on Earth and their place in space.


By the end of the departmental activities, each participant will be able to identify and describe the key interactions between space and society, and use new skills positively for their communities at work and at home.

Remco Timmermans
Remco Timmermans
Co-Chair
Daniel Rockberger
Daniel Rockberger
Co-Chair
Daniel Sackey
Daniel Sackey
Teaching Associate

Following rapid changes in modern society, the space industry is undergoing large structural changes. Many of these changes are driven by new space entrepreneurs, seeing new opportunities in technology and space related data. At the same time space is becoming increasingly accessible, with ever shrinking spacecraft, cheaper launchers and more widely available space data.

These changes are a challenge to traditional space organizations and new space entrepreneurs alike. Traditional players will need to adapt their business models and methods to the new reality, while entrepreneurs and startups get new opportunities to develop products and services. Often these two come together in commercial and other partnerships. This trend of continuous change and new opportunities will increasingly continue in the next decades, requiring both existing and new space professionals to understand how to respond.

The SSP17 Space Management and Business Department will prepare future space managers, as well as aspiring new space entrepreneurs, for the space industry of the 21st century. In the department, we will start with the ‘management and business basics’, that are the same for big and small space businesses. We will then zoom in on the trends that disrupt the industry and look at how big and small companies can benefit from these disruptions. Subsequently we will focus on the differences between traditional businesses and startups, where we aim to help kickstart both new managers in large companies and new entrepreneurs in startups.

Learning outcomes for the Space Management and Business Department are:

  • Learn about modern management and business models and methods. This includes terminology and concepts related to organization design, sales and marketing, project management, finance, communication, and people management.
  • Learn valuable space business lessons direct from people in the field.
  • Understand how trends in and outside the space industry are changing the way the industry works, and how managers should deal with these changes.
  • Learn how to start and manage your own new space company.
Ray A. Williamson
Ray Williamson
Chair
Timiebi Aganaba
Timiebi Aganaba
Associate Chair
Ana Cristina Rosa
Ana Cristina van Oijhuizen Galhego Rosa
Teaching Associate

The US Presidency and Brexit, have revealed the tensions that a focus on nationalism brings. On the other extreme in Africa and Middle East the issue of refugees not having the choice or ability to choose nationalism and being “unwanted” by some in the international community is also a problem…either way we dice it up the ideas of cosmopolitanism are under attack. We see these same tensions in the space domain. Do we go to the Moon or Mars next? Do we focus on the classic suppliers like Lockheed Martin and Boeing or do we invest in the new actors like Space-X? With the uncertainty of the US presidency, no-one knows which way things will go! Now that more diverse actors want in on space, should there be more restrictions – perhaps some just don’t see new space debris mitigation and remediation “guidelines and standards” as for the greater good, but as barriers to entry? Or, can everyone work together if we just find the right process and mechanism to cooperate, despite that there are so many challenges to working together, such as mistrust, bureaucracy, and differing capabilities! We need a new lens to view international cooperation! At the end of the day, hardware and software don’t have tensions, it’s the humans operating them that do.

Elon Musk (Space X), Richard Branson (Virgin Galactic), Planetary Resources and the Luxembourg Government (Space mining) are mainstream actors who are now interested in space commerce. While space has been an interesting domain to learn lessons in international cooperation, with the International Space Station, there is now a role for private actors as there has never been before, and the space sector needs some lessons about multi-stakeholder partnership governance. The commercialization of spaces beyond territorial sovereignty is in many ways peculiar and raises fundamental questions that are at the heart of the regime of investment protection, and about the new role for private sector in global space governance, resulting in the emergence of new institutions like the Isle of Man’s International Institute of Space Commerce.

2018 is a big year for space because it’s 50 years of the UN Space Conference and the Outer Space Treaty. The UN is celebrating this through an initiative called UNISPACE+50 and they are working with all relevant stakeholders in addressing the overarching long-term development concerns and developing a road-map aimed at defining concrete deliverables of outer space for the development of nations under the four pillars: Space Economy, Space Society, Space Accessibility and Space Diplomacy. The PEL department doesn’t just address the procedural mechanisms of international cooperation but the main issues that actors have to consider, based on their strategic objectives which include questions of international and local law, international and national politics and economics.

Participants of the PEL department will participate in exploration of issues, debates, and interactions designed to provide an in-depth understanding of what shapes current and future space activities around the world, along with their societal impacts, justifications, and benefits. They will also encounter the international and national legal frameworks within which space activities are conducted. A range of international political, economic, and legal experts will work with participants on topics that may include:

  • What are the geopolitical contexts and tensions affecting activities in outer space?
  • What political and economic rationales persuade governments to invest in national space programs?
  • How do we measure the success of national and international space efforts?
  • How well are nations cooperating in international space projects and what mechanisms exist to promote cooperation?
  • How and why are laws regulating national space activities enacted and what are the differences?
  • How effective are space agencies in delivering national benefits and how are they measured?
  • Do the current space treaties and agreements adequately address the current and future needs of the international space community?
  • What are the obstacles to changes in international space law?
  • What are the legal and regulatory challenges for space business and initiatives?

 

Participants with scientific and technical backgrounds are especially urged to join the department, though all are welcome. This department will help participants gain perspective on the policymaking and legal processes related to space activities and understand better the basis of investment in space. This perspective is an attractive one for technically minded participants because it provides insights into the wider context in which space activities operate and highlights the checks and balances on activities. The take-away from this course is that just because a technical solution exists or a problem can be solved, does not mean it will be adopted, and in the absence of financial issues, whether or not to proceed generally derives from political, legal, economic and social considerations.

Eric Dalhstrom
Eric Dahlstrom
Chair
Marta Rocha de Oliveira
Marta Rocha de Oliveira
Teaching Associate

Space sciences introduce the principles, concepts, tools, and techniques necessary to investigate and understand the space environment. Department activities provide hands-on opportunities to learn about space sciences from experts in the field. Participants will work with telescopes (on site and remotely) to learn the fundamentals of astronomy and astrophotography. They will learn how to remotely operate a rover to conduct science missions. They will learn about the microgravity and near space high altitude environment. Through these activities, they will build an overall understanding of space sciences with the support of department faculty and lecturers. Participants will prepare and present on a subject of particular interest, agreed upon with the departmental team. Entering the exciting world of space sciences does not require a degree in science or engineering; participants from all backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

At the end of the department, the participants should be able to:

  • Understand the science and operational aspects of conducting a teleoperated simulated rover mission by taking on a specific role as part of the operational team
  • Develop and conduct a stratospheric balloon and microgravity experiment
  • Obtain and process astronomical images using available cameras and telescopes, as well as plan and operate remotely controlled astronomical telescopes
  • Conduct individual science research or experiments through interaction with local experts